Altoida NMI - The true benefit is early detection and prediction

 

Putting Patients First - Owning the the future of healthcare together

 

Know your Brain Health - Take informed decisions

Altoida NMI Assessment for you or a loved one – Get Started

Altoida NMI - The true benefit is early detection and prediction

 

Putting Patients First - Owning the the future of healthcare together

 

Know your Brain Health - Take informed decisions

Altoida NMI Assessment for you or a loved one – Get Started

Altoida’s digital biomarkers harness advances in technology to detect brain changes early in the disease process, helping to accelerate early diagnosis for better clinical outcomes and delay of disease onset. Using an iPad or a Tablet accelerometer, gyroscope and touch screen sensors, Altoida is able to detect “micro-errors” as both a prognostic and diagnostic digital biomarker. The result is that medical professionals are able to detect Alzheimer’s in patients 62+ years old between six and ten years prior to the onset of symptoms – and before irreversible damage occurs.

 

Our accurate technology analyzes visuospatial and executive function during complex activities of daily living through a battery of three tests that ask patients to hide and seek virtual objects in a physical space. We have validated our platform and methodology in more than 12 peer-reviewed journal publications and in more than 200 independent studies.

 

Alzheimer’s Disease Facts & Figures, an annual report released by the Alzheimer’s Association®, reveals the burden of Alzheimer’s and dementia on individuals, caregivers, government and the national health care system.

Quick Facts

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE IS THE 6TH LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH IN THE UNITED STATES

BETWEEN 2000 AND 2017 DEATHS FROM HEART DISEASE HAVE DECREASED 9% WHILE DEATHS FROM ALZHEIMER’S HAVE INCREASED 145%

IN 2019, ALZHEIMER’S AND OTHER DEMENTIAS WILL COST THE NATION $290 BILLION. BY 2050, THESE COSTS COULD RISE AS HIGH AS $1.1 TRILLION

MORE THAN 16 MILLION AMERICANS PROVIDE UNPAID CARE FOR PEOPLE WITH ALZHEIMER’S OR OTHER DEMENTIAS

1 IN 3 SENIORS DIES WITH ALZHEIMER’S OR ANOTHER DEMENTIA. IT KILLS MORE THAN BREAST CANCER AND PROSTATE CANCER COMBINED

5.8 MILLION AMERICANS ARE LIVING WITH ALZHEIMER’S. BY 2050, THIS NUMBER IS PROJECTED TO RISE TO NEARLY 14 MILLION

THESE CAREGIVERS PROVIDED AN ESTIMATED 18.5 BILLION HOURS OF CARE VALUED AT NEARLY $234 BILLION

ONLY 16% OF SENIORS RECEIVE REGULAR COGNITIVE ASSESSMENTS DURING ROUTINE HEALTH CHECK-UPS

EVERY 65 SECONDS SOMEONE IN THE UNITED STATES DEVELOPS THE DISEASE

Quick Facts

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE IS THE 6TH LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH IN THE UNITED STATES

BETWEEN 2000 AND 2017 DEATHS FROM HEART DISEASE HAVE DECREASED 9% WHILE DEATHS FROM ALZHEIMER’S HAVE INCREASED 145%

IN 2019, ALZHEIMER’S AND OTHER DEMENTIAS WILL COST THE NATION $290 BILLION. BY 2050, THESE COSTS COULD RISE AS HIGH AS $1.1 TRILLION

MORE THAN 16 MILLION AMERICANS PROVIDE UNPAID CARE FOR PEOPLE WITH ALZHEIMER’S OR OTHER DEMENTIAS

1 IN 3 SENIORS DIES WITH ALZHEIMER’S OR ANOTHER DEMENTIA. IT KILLS MORE THAN BREAST CANCER AND PROSTATE CANCER COMBINED

5.8 MILLION AMERICANS ARE LIVING WITH ALZHEIMER’S. BY 2050, THIS NUMBER IS PROJECTED TO RISE TO NEARLY 14 MILLION

THESE CAREGIVERS PROVIDED AN ESTIMATED 18.5 BILLION HOURS OF CARE VALUED AT NEARLY $234 BILLION

ONLY 16% OF SENIORS RECEIVE REGULAR COGNITIVE ASSESSMENTS DURING ROUTINE HEALTH CHECK-UPS

EVERY 65 SECONDS SOMEONE IN THE UNITED STATES DEVELOPS THE DISEASE

What Is Alzheimer's or short AD?

Alzheimer’s is a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms usually develop slowly and get worse over time, becoming severe enough to interfere with daily tasks. The most common early symptom of Alzheimer’s is difficulty remembering newly learned information. Alzheimer’s and other dementias cause memory, thinking, and behavior changes that interfere with daily living.

10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer's

Memory loss that disrupts daily life may be a symptom of Alzheimer’s or other dementia. Alzheimer’s is a brain disease that causes a slow decline in memory, thinking and reasoning skills. There are 10 warning signs and symptoms. If you notice any of them, don’t ignore them. Schedule an appointment with your doctor.

Memory loss that disrupts daily life

One of the most common signs of Alzheimer’s disease, especially in the early stage, is forgetting recently learned information. Read More

Challenges in planning or solving problems

Some people may experience changes in their ability to develop and follow a plan or work with numbers. Read More

Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work or at leisure

People with Alzheimer’s often find it hard to complete daily tasks. Read More

Confusion with time or place

People with Alzheimer’s can lose track of dates, seasons and the passage of time. Read More

Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships

For some people, having vision problems is a sign of Alzheimer’s. Read More

New problems with words in speaking or writing

People with Alzheimer’s may have trouble following or joining a conversation. Read More

Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps

A person with Alzheimer’s disease may put things in unusual places. Read More

Decreased or poor judgment

People with Alzheimer’s may experience changes in judgment or decision-making. Read More

Withdrawal from work or social activities

A person with Alzheimer’s may start to remove themselves from hobbies, social activities, work projects or sports. Read More

Changes in mood and personality

The mood and personalities of people with Alzheimer’s can change. Read More

What can patients do to preserve healthy cognition?

Brain Training

Strength training

Stimulate your brain

Medication and Dietary Supplements

Subsequent Health Issues

Diet

Understanding Alzheimer's and dementia

  • Alzheimer’s is the most common cause of dementia, a general term for memory loss and other cognitive abilities serious enough to interfere with daily life. Alzheimer’s disease accounts for 60 percent to 80 percent of dementia cases.

  • Alzheimer’s is not a normal part of aging. The greatest known risk factor is increasing age, and the majority of people with Alzheimer’s are 65 and older. But Alzheimer’s is not just a disease of old age. Approximately 200,000 Americans under the age of 65 have younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease (also known as early-onset Alzheimer’s).

  • Alzheimer’s worsens over time. Alzheimer’s is a progressive disease, where dementia symptoms gradually worsen over a number of years. In its early stages, memory loss is mild, but with late-stage Alzheimer’s, individuals lose the ability to carry on a conversation and respond to their environment. Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. On average, a person with Alzheimer’s lives four to eight years after diagnosis, but can live as long as 20 years, depending on other factors.

  • Alzheimer’s has no current cure, but treatments for symptoms are available and research continues. Although current Alzheimer’s treatments cannot stop Alzheimer’s from progressing, they can temporarily slow the worsening of dementia symptoms and improve quality of life for those with Alzheimer’s and their caregivers. Today, there is a worldwide effort under way to find better ways to treat the disease, delay its onset, and prevent it from developing.

If the diagnosis is Alzheimer’s or another dementia, you are not alone

Clinical Pathway in AD

No single diagnostic test can determine if a person has Alzheimer’s Disease to date. Physicians, with the support of specialists such as neurologists, neuropsychologists, geriatricians and geriatric psychiatrists, use a variety of approaches, like our Altoida NMI assessment technology and other tools to help make a diagnosis. Although physicians can almost always determine if a person has dementia, it may be difficult to identify the exact cause

During the medical workup, your health care provider will review your medical history, including psychiatric history and history of cognitive and behavioral changes. He or she will want to know about any current and past illnesses, as well as any medications you are taking. The doctor will also ask about key medical conditions affecting other family members, including whether they may have had Alzheimer’s Disease or other dementias

During a medical workup, and in addition to our NMI Cognitive Assessment Test you can expect the physician to:

  • Ask about diet, nutrition and use of alcohol
  • Review all medications
  • Check blood pressure, temperature and pulse
  • Listen to the heart and lungs
  • Perform other procedures to assess overall health
  • Collect blood or urine samples for laboratory testing

 

Information from a physical exam and laboratory tests can help identify health issues that can cause symptoms of dementia. Common causes of dementia-like symptoms are depression, untreated sleep apnea, delirium, side effects of medications, thyroid problems, certain vitamin deficiencies and excessive alcohol consumption. Unlike Alzheimer’s and other dementias, these conditions often may be reversed with treatment

  • What kind of symptoms have you noticed?
  • When did they begin?
  • How often do they happen?
  • Have they gotten worse?

 

The doctor may also ask a family member to provide input about changes in your thinking skills and behavior. You might be required to complete a Doctor Visit Checklist for your appointment

During a neurological exam, the physician will closely evaluate the person for problems that may signal brain disorders other than Alzheimer’s. The doctor will look for signs of small or large strokes, Parkinson’s disease, brain tumors, fluid accumulation on the brain, and other illnesses that may impair memory or thinking.

If the evaluation does not indicate Alzheimer’s Disease or another dementia, but the symptoms continue to get worse over time, your doctor may need to order more tests.

 
The physician will test:

  • Reflexes.
  • Coordination, muscle tone and strength.
  • Eye movement.
  • Speech.
  • Sensation. 

The neurological exam may also include a brain imaging study.

Mental status testing evaluates memory, ability to solve simple problems and other thinking skills. Such tests give an overall sense of whether a person:

  • Is aware of symptoms
  • Knows the date, time, and where he or she is
  • Can remember a short list of words, follow instructions and do simple calculations

 

The MMSE and Mini-Cog paper & pencil tests are two commonly assessments, used in conjunction with our NMI Cognitive Assessment Test.

During the MMSE, a health professional asks a patient a series of questions designed to test a range of everyday mental skills. The maximum MMSE score is 30 points. A score of 20 to 24 suggests mild dementia, 13 to 20 suggests moderate dementia, and less than 12 indicates severe dementia. On average, the MMSE score of a person with Alzheimer’s declines about two to four points each year.

During the Mini-Cog, a person is asked to complete two tasks:

  1. Remember and a few minutes later repeat the names of three common objects.
  2. Draw a face of a clock showing all 12 numbers in the right places and a time specified by the examiner.

Some physicians use our NMI Cognitive Assessment Test in addition to the MMSE and Mini-Cog. The Altoida NMI assessment test has several advantages, including giving tests exactly the same way each time. Using both clinical tests and our assessment tool can give physicians a clearer understanding of cognitive difficulties experienced by patients.

The results of this and our gamified test can help a physician determine if further evaluation is needed.

In addition to assessing mental status, the doctor will evaluate a person’s sense of well-being to detect depression or other mood disorders that can cause memory problems, loss of interest in life, and other symptoms that can overlap with dementia.

Researchers have identified certain genes that increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s and other rare “deterministic” genes that directly cause Alzheimer’s. Although genetic tests are available for some of these genes, health professionals do not currently recommend routine genetic testing for Alzheimer’s disease.

Risk genes: While there is a blood test for APOE-e4, the strongest risk gene for Alzheimer’s, this test is mainly used in clinical trials to identify people at higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s. Carrying this gene mutation only indicates a greater risk; it does not indicate whether a person will develop Alzheimer’s or whether a person has Alzheimer’s. Genetic testing for APOE-e4 is controversial and should only be undertaken after discussion with a physician or genetic counselor.

Deterministic genes: Testing also is available for genes that cause autosomal dominant Alzheimer’s disease (ADAD) or “familial Alzheimer’s,” a rare form of Alzheimer’s that accounts for 1 percent or less of all cases. ADAD runs strongly in families and tends to begin earlier in life, sometimes as early as one’s 30s. Many people in these families do not wish to know their genetic status, but some get tested to learn whether they will eventually develop the disease. Some ADAD families have joined clinical studies to help researchers better understand Alzheimer’s.

A standard medical workup for Alzheimer’s disease often includes structural imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). These tests are primarily used to rule out other conditions that may cause symptoms similar to Alzheimer’s but require different treatment. Structural imaging can reveal tumors, evidence of small or large strokes, damage from severe head trauma, or a buildup of fluid in the brain.

In some circumstances, a doctor may use brain imaging tools to find out if the individual has high levels of beta-amyloid, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s; normal levels would suggest Alzheimer’s is not the cause of dementia.

Imaging technologies have revolutionized our understanding of the structure and function of the living brain. Researchers are studying other brain imaging techniques so they can better diagnose and track the progress of Alzheimer’s.

Altoida Inc., Houston, USA
Altoida AG, Lucerne, Switzerland

contact@altoida.com

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